Why many still doubt the theory of evolution

            Many people wonder today why there are still so many creationists left among the general populace even though the scientific community supposedly disproved our explanation of origins 150 years ago.  Polls consistently show that a large number of Americans, possibly a majority, have serious doubts about evolution. During the last decade this divide in public opinion came to a forefront as backers of “intelligent design” shocked the academic community by organizing an unexpectedly strong legal effort to force public schools to teach their theory alongside evolution. This attempt was inevitably quashed in the courts, but it undoubtedly left a strong impression in the minds of biology teachers around the country, many of whom believed that the creationist movement had been slowly dieing out since its much-publicized embarrassment at the Scopes trial many decades ago.  They were surprised to see how strong it still was.

            Many of these professors, no doubt, consider this continued rejection or partial rejection of evolution to be a sign of pure stubbornness and wishful thinking on the part of creationists, or more likely, the result of excessive ignorance.  Perhaps they blame it on the admittedly sorry state of public schools, where many students easily coast through high school each year without learning very much.  To many of these scientists, evolution is as much a proven fact as electromagnetic waves or atomic theory.  The same kind of scientific reasoning that resulted in the creation of the theory of relativity and microwave ovens, they believe, has also given us punctuated equilibrium and Potassium-Argon dating.  They claim that we cannot accept the former group of scientific breakthroughs unless we accept the latter as well.  They say that if we doubt their claims that humans evolved from monkeys, then we should also doubt their claims that traveling near the speed of light changes the rate at which we experience the passage of time.

            I cannot speak for all creationists. They must be a very diverse group if they account for half of the American population.  I can only speak for myself.  Pure stubbornness is not the reason I believe that evolution is true.  I reject it because of, faith in God and the Bible, and, because I honestly, truly believe that it is an unscientific theory. I think the idea that more complex organisms evolved from simpler ones through repeated inbreeding is without foundation.  I believe that the evidence shows that the theory of evolution, contrary to what many people claim, has not been subjected to the same level of scrutiny as the other great models of science such as Einstein’s famous theory which was mentioned above.  I can support this claim with quotes by evolutionists, such as the one below:

                “The principle of hierarchy of selection added to evolution another tier of complexity, far away from the reductionist influence of Dawkins and far away from the frame-work of the more physical sciences.  If selection works at all these levels, and combines with system constraints and chance, then evolution will never be explainable in terms of simple, rigorous laws and principles. Gould, Mayr, and ecologists assert that biology is not given to the same framework as physics and chemistry. As a science, it is too complex for that.”

                “They suggest a better way to study biology may be through narrative. Scientists should not expect to be able to explain biology in terms of laws and formulas. Perhaps the way Darwin presented his ideas, using description and argument, was after all the most appropriate way to approach it.”   (emphasis mine)

Mills, Cynthia L. The Theory of Evolution. John Wiley and Sons, Inc. Hoboken, New Jersey. 2004. page 183

            The first time I read the quote above it seriously startled me. Although I already believed that the theory of evolution ran contrary to the physical laws, I never expected that the top evolutionists themselves would come so close to admitting it.   The paragraph communicates the genuine sense of frustration that haunts many a scientist attempting to work out the precise ways in which evolution happened. Of course theirs is a difficult job: biology is a complicated subject and attempting to resurrect the past is no easy feat.  Nevertheless, physics and chemistry are complicated subjects as well.  If evolution really happened on such a massive scale as the scientists claim it did, then we should be able to mass real evidence of complexity evolving out of simplicity, since evolution is supposedly an extremely common occurrence.  One should be able to mount a productive investigation without recourse to metaphysics.  I understand that a more hypothetical approach to science is often a necessary beginning in obscure and challenging subjects such as the study of sub-atomic particles, but for a subject as tangible as the evolution of life one would expect that our level of understanding would be much more advanced.  After all, all the creatures in the world are supposedly the result of a parallel process stretching back over a billion years to a common ancestor, and yet our attempts to reconstruct this pathway even hypothetically are continually blocked in many different ways.  I understand, of course, that science is always a work in progress, and that nothing is never 100% certain, but it is fair, I think, to demand to see tangible results before I surrender and admit that this theory contains the final truth on the matter. The reason I defer to the scientists in the field of chemistry is because they have produced substantiated, testable results.  The evolutionists, however, have not yet earned my trust, and based on the many problems with their theory, I am certain they never will.

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